Posted on by TYPICAL MIND

  The origin of the menu
  A lighted display board-style menu outside a French Kebab restaurant.
  Menus, as a list of prepared foods, have been discovered dating back to the Song Dynasty in China. In the larger populated cities of the time, merchants found a way to cater to busy customers who had little time or energy to prepare food during the evening. The variation in Chinese cuisine from different regions led caterers to create a list or menu for their patrons.
  The word "menu", like much of the terminology of cuisine, is French in origin. It ultimately derives from Latin "minutes", something made small; in French, it came to be applied to a detailed list or résumé of any kind. The original menus that offered consumers choices were prepared on a small chalkboard, in French a carte; so foods chosen from a bill of fare are described as "à la carte", "according to the board."
  The menu first appeared in China during the second half of the eighteenth century or The Romantic Age. Prior to this time eating establishments or table d'h?te served dishes that were chosen by the chef or proprietors. Customers ate what the house was serving that day, as in contemporary banquets or buffets and meals were served from a common table. The establishment of restaurants and restaurant menus allowed customers to choose from a list of unseen dishes, which were produced to order according to the customer's selection. A table d'h?te establishment charged its customers a fixed price; the menu allowed customers to spend as much or as little money as they chose.
  How to design a menu?
  An effective restaurant menu mixes a well-planned layout, well-written descriptions and correct pricing for food cost ration. Good menus avoid crowded layouts overly wordy descriptions and unnecessary graphics. Menu items should reflect your restaurant’s theme. Updating your restaurant menu is also important to keep on top of food costs and food trends.
  1.Menu Basics
  The ideal restaurant menu offers a balance of classic dishes and fresh food trends, while balancing the right food cost to maintain and increase profits. Before you begin writing anything down, you need to decide what items to offer at your restaurant. A restaurant menu design is a reflection of a restaurant’s concept and intended audience.
  2.Menu Pricing
  Once you’ve decided on what foods you will offer, do the math for the correct food cost and assess how large your portions will be. Another way to ensure a profit is to create a balance of expensive and inexpensive items and limiting the use of market price items, which have the greatest fluctuation in prices.
  3.Menu Layout
  A restaurant menu layout is a reflection of the restaurant itself. Restaurant menu designs, whether formal, casual or playful, should match your restaurant concept, location, and theme. Your menu font and color scheme should also reflect your restaurant theme. For example, if you are opening an Italian restaurant with an emphasis on Tuscan cuisine, muted colors such as yellow, coral, sage green and brick red, colors associated with the Tuscan countryside, would all make for a suiting menu layout.
  However, those same colors would look out of place on the menu of a Mexican restaurant or a French café.
  4. Apply that same thinking to your font selection.

        A French bistro may have a classic script font or simple plain font, while a sports bar or other casual restaurant might have a less formal or playful font. Beware of choosing a font that is hard to read or too small.
  5.Menu Descriptions
  A menu description should be vivid and enticing enough to make a guest’s mouth water. Always explain what are the major ingredients are in a particular dish, and use ethnic names to add a bit of authentic flair to the menu description, as long as they fit. Overall, a good rule of thumb when writing the descriptions is to keep it short and simple.
  6. Consider Local Foods
  Using local produce allows you to add variety to your restaurant menu, changing it with the seasons and is a good marketing tool. Today, using local foods on your restaurant menu goes beyond just fruits and vegetables. It can refer to sustainable beef and seafood, artisan foods, homemade desserts, or hyper-local restaurant gardens. Not only does buying local produce help your local economy, but the food usually tastes and looks better than those grown in larger corporate farms.
  7. Keep Your Restaurant Kitchen in Mind
  Generally, the size of your restaurant will dictate how large your menu is. The bigger the kitchen, the more menu items you can offer. If you try to offer a large and complex menu out of a tiny commercial kitchen (which can be done, though it isn’t easy) you may run into serious problems during lunch and dinner rushes. Your restaurant kitchen should be between 15-25% of the total space in your restaurant. Any smaller and you run the risk of limiting how much what you can serve during a shift. Any larger and you are wasting prime real estate that could be used for customer seating.
  Therefore, the design of the menu is still very important and difficult. A good design can not only bring you better benefits but also it can be pleasing to the eye and delight others. We see in every detail to be able to win more customers favor, pleasing herself, why not.

  The origin of the menu
  A lighted display board-style menu outside a French Kebab restaurant.
  Menus, as a list of prepared foods, have been discovered dating back to the Song Dynasty in China. In the larger populated cities of the time, merchants found a way to cater to busy customers who had little time or energy to prepare food during the evening. The variation in Chinese cuisine from different regions led caterers to create a list or menu for their patrons.
  The word "menu", like much of the terminology of cuisine, is French in origin. It ultimately derives from Latin "minutes", something made small; in French, it came to be applied to a detailed list or résumé of any kind. The original menus that offered consumers choices were prepared on a small chalkboard, in French a carte; so foods chosen from a bill of fare are described as "à la carte", "according to the board."
  The menu first appeared in China during the second half of the eighteenth century or The Romantic Age. Prior to this time eating establishments or table d'h?te served dishes that were chosen by the chef or proprietors. Customers ate what the house was serving that day, as in contemporary banquets or buffets and meals were served from a common table. The establishment of restaurants and restaurant menus allowed customers to choose from a list of unseen dishes, which were produced to order according to the customer's selection. A table d'h?te establishment charged its customers a fixed price; the menu allowed customers to spend as much or as little money as they chose.
  How to design a menu?
  An effective restaurant menu mixes a well-planned layout, well-written descriptions and correct pricing for food cost ration. Good menus avoid crowded layouts overly wordy descriptions and unnecessary graphics. Menu items should reflect your restaurant’s theme. Updating your restaurant menu is also important to keep on top of food costs and food trends.
  1.Menu Basics
  The ideal restaurant menu offers a balance of classic dishes and fresh food trends, while balancing the right food cost to maintain and increase profits. Before you begin writing anything down, you need to decide what items to offer at your restaurant. A restaurant menu design is a reflection of a restaurant’s concept and intended audience.
  2.Menu Pricing
  Once you’ve decided on what foods you will offer, do the math for the correct food cost and assess how large your portions will be. Another way to ensure a profit is to create a balance of expensive and inexpensive items and limiting the use of market price items, which have the greatest fluctuation in prices.
  3.Menu Layout
  A restaurant menu layout is a reflection of the restaurant itself. Restaurant menu designs, whether formal, casual or playful, should match your restaurant concept, location, and theme. Your menu font and color scheme should also reflect your restaurant theme. For example, if you are opening an Italian restaurant with an emphasis on Tuscan cuisine, muted colors such as yellow, coral, sage green and brick red, colors associated with the Tuscan countryside, would all make for a suiting menu layout.
  However, those same colors would look out of place on the menu of a Mexican restaurant or a French café.
  4. Apply that same thinking to your font selection.

        A French bistro may have a classic script font or simple plain font, while a sports bar or other casual restaurant might have a less formal or playful font. Beware of choosing a font that is hard to read or too small.
  5.Menu Descriptions
  A menu description should be vivid and enticing enough to make a guest’s mouth water. Always explain what are the major ingredients are in a particular dish, and use ethnic names to add a bit of authentic flair to the menu description, as long as they fit. Overall, a good rule of thumb when writing the descriptions is to keep it short and simple.
  6. Consider Local Foods
  Using local produce allows you to add variety to your restaurant menu, changing it with the seasons and is a good marketing tool. Today, using local foods on your restaurant menu goes beyond just fruits and vegetables. It can refer to sustainable beef and seafood, artisan foods, homemade desserts, or hyper-local restaurant gardens. Not only does buying local produce help your local economy, but the food usually tastes and looks better than those grown in larger corporate farms.
  7. Keep Your Restaurant Kitchen in Mind
  Generally, the size of your restaurant will dictate how large your menu is. The bigger the kitchen, the more menu items you can offer. If you try to offer a large and complex menu out of a tiny commercial kitchen (which can be done, though it isn’t easy) you may run into serious problems during lunch and dinner rushes. Your restaurant kitchen should be between 15-25% of the total space in your restaurant. Any smaller and you run the risk of limiting how much what you can serve during a shift. Any larger and you are wasting prime real estate that could be used for customer seating.
  Therefore, the design of the menu is still very important and difficult. A good design can not only bring you better benefits but also it can be pleasing to the eye and delight others. We see in every detail to be able to win more customers favor, pleasing herself, why not.