Posted on by TYPICAL MIND

  Do you like fried food? Do you like KFC? Do you like fried chicken legs?
  If you are also a fried chicken enthusiast, have you ever known the history of fried chicken?
  The Roman cookbook of Apicius (4th century) has a recipe for deep-fried chicken called Pullum Frontonianum.
  The American English expression "fried chicken" is first recorded in the 1830s, and frequently appears in American cookbooks of the 1860s and 1870s. The origin of fried chicken in the southern states of America has been traced to precedents in either Scottish or West African cuisine.[clarification needed] Scottish fried chicken was cooked in fat (though unseasoned)while West African fried chicken was seasoned (but battered and cooked in palm oil). Scottish frying techniques and African seasoning techniques were used in the American South by African slaves. Fried chicken provided some means of the independent economy for enslaved and segregated African-American women, who became noted sellers of poultry (live or cooked) as early as the 1730s. Because of this and the expensive nature of the ingredients, it was, despite popular belief, a rare dish in the African-American community reserved (as in Africa) for special occasions.
  After the development of larger and faster-growing hogs (due to crosses between European and Asian breeds) in the 18th and 19th century in the United States, backyard and small-scale hog production provided an inexpensive means of converting waste food, crop waste, and garbage into calories (in a relatively small space and in a relatively short period of time). Many of those calories came in the form of fat and rendered lard. Lard was used for almost all cooking and was a fundamental component in many common homestead foods (many that today are still regarded as holiday and comfort foods) like biscuits and pies. The economic and caloric necessity of consuming lard and other saved fats may have led to the popularity of fried foods, not only in the US, but worldwide. In the 19th century, cast iron became widely available for use in cooking. The combination of flour, lard, a chicken and a heavy pan placed over a relatively controllable flame became the beginning of today's fried chicken.
  Fried Chicken Recipe
  Ingredients
  1-3/4 cups all-purpose flour
  1 tablespoon dried thyme
  1 tablespoon paprika
  2 teaspoons salt
  2 teaspoons garlic powder
  1 teaspoon pepper
  1 large egg
  1/3 cup whole milk
  2 tablespoons lemon juice
  1 broiler/fryer chicken (3 to 4 pounds), cut up
  Oil for deep-fat frying
  In a shallow bowl, mix the first six ingredients. In a separate shallow bowl, whisk egg, milk and lemon juice until blended. Dip chicken in flour mixture to coat all sides; shake off excess. Dip in egg mixture, then again in flour mixture.
  In an electric skillet or deep fryer, heat oil to 375°. Fry chicken, a few pieces at a time, 6-10 minutes on each side or until golden brown and chicken juices run clear. Drain on paper towels.
  Finally, I want to remind all food lovers who love fried chicken: For your health and size, DO NOT eat too much.

  Do you like fried food? Do you like KFC? Do you like fried chicken legs?
  If you are also a fried chicken enthusiast, have you ever known the history of fried chicken?
  The Roman cookbook of Apicius (4th century) has a recipe for deep-fried chicken called Pullum Frontonianum.
  The American English expression "fried chicken" is first recorded in the 1830s, and frequently appears in American cookbooks of the 1860s and 1870s. The origin of fried chicken in the southern states of America has been traced to precedents in either Scottish or West African cuisine.[clarification needed] Scottish fried chicken was cooked in fat (though unseasoned)while West African fried chicken was seasoned (but battered and cooked in palm oil). Scottish frying techniques and African seasoning techniques were used in the American South by African slaves. Fried chicken provided some means of the independent economy for enslaved and segregated African-American women, who became noted sellers of poultry (live or cooked) as early as the 1730s. Because of this and the expensive nature of the ingredients, it was, despite popular belief, a rare dish in the African-American community reserved (as in Africa) for special occasions.
  After the development of larger and faster-growing hogs (due to crosses between European and Asian breeds) in the 18th and 19th century in the United States, backyard and small-scale hog production provided an inexpensive means of converting waste food, crop waste, and garbage into calories (in a relatively small space and in a relatively short period of time). Many of those calories came in the form of fat and rendered lard. Lard was used for almost all cooking and was a fundamental component in many common homestead foods (many that today are still regarded as holiday and comfort foods) like biscuits and pies. The economic and caloric necessity of consuming lard and other saved fats may have led to the popularity of fried foods, not only in the US, but worldwide. In the 19th century, cast iron became widely available for use in cooking. The combination of flour, lard, a chicken and a heavy pan placed over a relatively controllable flame became the beginning of today's fried chicken.
  Fried Chicken Recipe
  Ingredients
  1-3/4 cups all-purpose flour
  1 tablespoon dried thyme
  1 tablespoon paprika
  2 teaspoons salt
  2 teaspoons garlic powder
  1 teaspoon pepper
  1 large egg
  1/3 cup whole milk
  2 tablespoons lemon juice
  1 broiler/fryer chicken (3 to 4 pounds), cut up
  Oil for deep-fat frying
  In a shallow bowl, mix the first six ingredients. In a separate shallow bowl, whisk egg, milk and lemon juice until blended. Dip chicken in flour mixture to coat all sides; shake off excess. Dip in egg mixture, then again in flour mixture.
  In an electric skillet or deep fryer, heat oil to 375°. Fry chicken, a few pieces at a time, 6-10 minutes on each side or until golden brown and chicken juices run clear. Drain on paper towels.
  Finally, I want to remind all food lovers who love fried chicken: For your health and size, DO NOT eat too much.