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  • How to Make Bubble Tea? How to Make Bubble Tea?

    Posted on by TYPICAL MIND

    Originating from Taiwan, bubble tea usually consists of sweetened tea with milk and the characteristic chewy tapioca balls, also known as boba. Bubble tea comes in many flavors: plain tea flavors such as black or jasmine tea, fruit flavors such as strawberry or honeydew, and even taro, which is a root vegetable commonly used in Asian dishes. 

    Bubble drinks are usually cool, refreshing, and a sweet drink with tapioca pearls sitting on the bottom of a clear cup. Sometimes the drink is made with fresh fruits, milk, and crushed ice to create a healthy milk shake. You can also find drinks that are made of powdered flavoring, creamer, water, and crushed ice. And if you like it like the Asians do, the cool drink usually includes a healthy tea, infused by a flavoring.

    Tapioca pearls are black, but can sometimes be found to be white or transparent. Depending on the ingredients of the pearl, the color varies. I've been told that the white and translucent pearls are made of tapioca starch in it's natural form. The black pearl includes tapioca starch, sometimes cassava root, brown sugar and caramel which add the black color.

    The consistency of tapioca pearls are somewhere between jell-o and chewing gum. In fact, many people think it's somewhat of a 'gummy bear' texture.  Nonetheless, the way the tapioca feels when you chew it is absolutely unique. The tapioca pearls used in bubble tea are the size of a marble. The tapioca pearls are also known as the "boba" in the bubble tea drink.  This is because it is described as having the same texture as the female breasts.

    A clear cup with black tapioca balls on the bottom can easily identify bubble tea drinks. Another obvious trait is a huge fat straw. The fat straw is needed so that the tapioca pearls can be sucked up with the bubble tea drink and eaten. Bubble Tea's appearance definitely makes it unique.

    So how to make bubble tea at home? And what kind of material should you choose? Read on!

    Author: Lisa Lin 

    Prep Time: 2 hours

    Cook Time: 10 minutes

    Total Time: 2 hours 10 minutes

    Yield: 4 drinks

    INGREDIENTS

    8 bags of black tea

    4 cups just boiled water

    3/4 cup quick-cooking tapioca pearls

    whole milk to serve (or your choice of milk)

    simple syrup to serve (or your choice of sweetener)

    For the Simple Syrup

    1 cup water

    1 sugar

    INSTRUCTIONS

    Prepare the tea: Steep the tea bags with 4 cups of just boiled water. Let the tea sit until it reaches room temperature. There’s no need to remove the tea bags from the water as the tea is steeping. You can stick the tea in the fridge to speed up the cooling process.

    Prepare the simple syrup (if using): Add the water to a saucepan and heat the water until it starts to simmer. Add the sugar and stir until the sugar dissolves. Remove the saucepan from heat and let the simple syrup cool before transferring to a jar.

    Cook the tapioca pearls: Bring about 4 cups of water to boil and add the tapioca pearls. Stir the pearls and let them cook for about 5 minutes. The pearls should have floated to the top by now. Drain and rinse the pearls under cold water. Transfer them to a bowl.

    Assemble the drinks: Divide the cooked tapioca pearls into 4 large glasses. Next, add a few ice cubes to each glass. Pour 1 cup of the tea into each glass. Add 1 1/2 tablespoons of milk and 1 1/2 tablespoons of simple syrup into each glass. Stir and taste the milk tea. Add more milk or simple syrup to your taste. If you are serving the beverage to guests, have a small pitcher of milk and jar of simple syrup ready so that they can adjust the drink to their taste. The drink is usually served with large boba straws (large enough for the tapioca pearls to go through). If you don’t have the straws on hand, you can use spoons to scoop out the tapioca pearls.

    Originating from Taiwan, bubble tea usually consists of sweetened tea with milk and the characteristic chewy tapioca balls, also known as boba. Bubble tea comes in many flavors: plain tea flavors such as black or jasmine tea, fruit flavors such as strawberry or honeydew, and even taro, which is a root vegetable commonly used in Asian dishes. 

    Bubble drinks are usually cool, refreshing, and a sweet drink with tapioca pearls sitting on the bottom of a clear cup. Sometimes the drink is made with fresh fruits, milk, and crushed ice to create a healthy milk shake. You can also find drinks that are made of powdered flavoring, creamer, water, and crushed ice. And if you like it like the Asians do, the cool drink usually includes a healthy tea, infused by a flavoring.

    Tapioca pearls are black, but can sometimes be found to be white or transparent. Depending on the ingredients of the pearl, the color varies. I've been told that the white and translucent pearls are made of tapioca starch in it's natural form. The black pearl includes tapioca starch, sometimes cassava root, brown sugar and caramel which add the black color.

    The consistency of tapioca pearls are somewhere between jell-o and chewing gum. In fact, many people think it's somewhat of a 'gummy bear' texture.  Nonetheless, the way the tapioca feels when you chew it is absolutely unique. The tapioca pearls used in bubble tea are the size of a marble. The tapioca pearls are also known as the "boba" in the bubble tea drink.  This is because it is described as having the same texture as the female breasts.

    A clear cup with black tapioca balls on the bottom can easily identify bubble tea drinks. Another obvious trait is a huge fat straw. The fat straw is needed so that the tapioca pearls can be sucked up with the bubble tea drink and eaten. Bubble Tea's appearance definitely makes it unique.

    So how to make bubble tea at home? And what kind of material should you choose? Read on!

    Author: Lisa Lin 

    Prep Time: 2 hours

    Cook Time: 10 minutes

    Total Time: 2 hours 10 minutes

    Yield: 4 drinks

    INGREDIENTS

    8 bags of black tea

    4 cups just boiled water

    3/4 cup quick-cooking tapioca pearls

    whole milk to serve (or your choice of milk)

    simple syrup to serve (or your choice of sweetener)

    For the Simple Syrup

    1 cup water

    1 sugar

    INSTRUCTIONS

    Prepare the tea: Steep the tea bags with 4 cups of just boiled water. Let the tea sit until it reaches room temperature. There’s no need to remove the tea bags from the water as the tea is steeping. You can stick the tea in the fridge to speed up the cooling process.

    Prepare the simple syrup (if using): Add the water to a saucepan and heat the water until it starts to simmer. Add the sugar and stir until the sugar dissolves. Remove the saucepan from heat and let the simple syrup cool before transferring to a jar.

    Cook the tapioca pearls: Bring about 4 cups of water to boil and add the tapioca pearls. Stir the pearls and let them cook for about 5 minutes. The pearls should have floated to the top by now. Drain and rinse the pearls under cold water. Transfer them to a bowl.

    Assemble the drinks: Divide the cooked tapioca pearls into 4 large glasses. Next, add a few ice cubes to each glass. Pour 1 cup of the tea into each glass. Add 1 1/2 tablespoons of milk and 1 1/2 tablespoons of simple syrup into each glass. Stir and taste the milk tea. Add more milk or simple syrup to your taste. If you are serving the beverage to guests, have a small pitcher of milk and jar of simple syrup ready so that they can adjust the drink to their taste. The drink is usually served with large boba straws (large enough for the tapioca pearls to go through). If you don’t have the straws on hand, you can use spoons to scoop out the tapioca pearls.

    Read more

  • Best Brownie Recipe Ever Best Brownie Recipe Ever

    Posted on by TYPICAL MIND

    A chocolate brownie (commonly referred to as simply brownie) is a square, baked, chocolate dessert. Brownies come in a variety of forms and may be either fudgy or cakey, depending on their density. They may include nuts, frosting, cream cheese, chocolate chips, or other ingredients. A variation made with vanilla rather than chocolate in the batter is called a blonde brownie or blondie. The brownie was developed in the United States at the end of the 19th century and popularized in the U.S. and Canada during the first half of the 20th century.

    Brownies are typically eaten by hand, often accompanied by milk, served warm with ice cream (a la mode), topped with whipped cream, or sprinkled with powdered sugar and fudge. In North America, they are common lunchbox treats and also popular in restaurants and coffeehouses.

    COOK TIME

    40-50 mins

    What you need:

    175g/6oz Odlums Cream Plain Flour

    225g/8oz Butter or Margarine (room temperature)

    125g/4oz Chocolate (good quality, at least 60% cocoa)

    325g/12oz Shamrock Golden Caster Sugar

    2 teaspoons Goodall's Vanilla Essence

    4 Eggs (beaten)

    80g Shamrock Chopped Walnuts

    Pinch of Salt

    ½ teaspoon Baking Powder

    How to:

    Preheat oven to 160°C/320°F/Gas 3. Lightly grease an oblong brownie tin. 25cm/10" x 15cm/6". Small roasting tin would also do.

    Melt the butter/margarine and chocolate together over low heat.

    Remove from heat, add the sugar and mix well.

    Add vanilla essence, eggs, and chopped walnuts.

    Sieve the flour, salt and baking powder together and gently stir into chocolate mixture.

    Pour into the prepared tin and bake for about 40-50 minutes until crusty on top.

    Remove from oven and allow to cool, cut into brownies.

    tips and tricks:

    Do not overbeat your batter once the flour and cocoa powder are added. That creates air pockets in the batter which will give you cake-like textured brownies.

    Please try not to over bake them. I liked mine at exactly 23 minutes in an 8×12-inch pan. You can go a little bit over if you like them set a bit more, but I don’t recommend it if you’re looking for the fudgiest brownies in the world. Remember, they will continue to bake slightly in the hot pan once pulled out of the oven. I use baking paper so I can pull them out of the pan easier after about 10-15 minutes from the oven (use your own discernment here), and place them GENTLY on a cooling rack.

    I bake my brownies on the top shelf in my oven. The middle shelf cooks them a lot faster, slightly burns them on the top and dries them out a little. Your oven may work differently.

    A chocolate brownie (commonly referred to as simply brownie) is a square, baked, chocolate dessert. Brownies come in a variety of forms and may be either fudgy or cakey, depending on their density. They may include nuts, frosting, cream cheese, chocolate chips, or other ingredients. A variation made with vanilla rather than chocolate in the batter is called a blonde brownie or blondie. The brownie was developed in the United States at the end of the 19th century and popularized in the U.S. and Canada during the first half of the 20th century.

    Brownies are typically eaten by hand, often accompanied by milk, served warm with ice cream (a la mode), topped with whipped cream, or sprinkled with powdered sugar and fudge. In North America, they are common lunchbox treats and also popular in restaurants and coffeehouses.

    COOK TIME

    40-50 mins

    What you need:

    175g/6oz Odlums Cream Plain Flour

    225g/8oz Butter or Margarine (room temperature)

    125g/4oz Chocolate (good quality, at least 60% cocoa)

    325g/12oz Shamrock Golden Caster Sugar

    2 teaspoons Goodall's Vanilla Essence

    4 Eggs (beaten)

    80g Shamrock Chopped Walnuts

    Pinch of Salt

    ½ teaspoon Baking Powder

    How to:

    Preheat oven to 160°C/320°F/Gas 3. Lightly grease an oblong brownie tin. 25cm/10" x 15cm/6". Small roasting tin would also do.

    Melt the butter/margarine and chocolate together over low heat.

    Remove from heat, add the sugar and mix well.

    Add vanilla essence, eggs, and chopped walnuts.

    Sieve the flour, salt and baking powder together and gently stir into chocolate mixture.

    Pour into the prepared tin and bake for about 40-50 minutes until crusty on top.

    Remove from oven and allow to cool, cut into brownies.

    tips and tricks:

    Do not overbeat your batter once the flour and cocoa powder are added. That creates air pockets in the batter which will give you cake-like textured brownies.

    Please try not to over bake them. I liked mine at exactly 23 minutes in an 8×12-inch pan. You can go a little bit over if you like them set a bit more, but I don’t recommend it if you’re looking for the fudgiest brownies in the world. Remember, they will continue to bake slightly in the hot pan once pulled out of the oven. I use baking paper so I can pull them out of the pan easier after about 10-15 minutes from the oven (use your own discernment here), and place them GENTLY on a cooling rack.

    I bake my brownies on the top shelf in my oven. The middle shelf cooks them a lot faster, slightly burns them on the top and dries them out a little. Your oven may work differently.

    Read more

  • Beer Glass Guide Beer Glass Guide

    Posted on by TYPICAL MIND

    Beer glasses make every brew taste better. Serve your suds in iced beer mugs or quaff craft beer in pilsner glasses. 

    I guess many people wonder why normally we use glasses to drink beer? When you drink out of a bottle or can, you leave your nose out of the party. There’s a case to be made that the eye is an important part of this equation, as well. Pouring a beer into a glass shows off its color, clarity, bubbles, and foam, a view that can add to your excitement when you’re about to partake in the refreshing elixir that’s been delighting humankind since approximately 9,000 B.C..Compared to the thousands of years that humans enjoyed a beer out of stone, wood, and even sacks of leather, the proliferation, and popularization of beer glasses are relatively new, given that glass wasn’t mass produced until the late 1800s.

    Here are a few types of beer glasses.

    1 Beer Mugs. The first mass-produced beer glass was the 10-sided pint mug. The mug replaced pewter tankards but maintained a handle, which kept pub patrons’ hands from inadvertently warming up their brews. After WWII, this model was replaced by a shorter and wider mug embellished with a grenade-like pattern. While not designed to enhance the taste of a beer, the mug’s character, sturdiness, and size makes it a great addition to a party, and it’s recently experienced a resurgence across the pub scene. A beer mug serves two main purposes: it helps you grip your wheat beer (when you’ve had a few extra) and ensures your hands don’t warm it up. They’re great for casually hanging at the bar or on the back deck. If you’re just trying to have your friends over to enjoy a few drinks.

    2 Pilsner Glasses. Tall, slim, and slightly wider at the mouth, a pilsner glass makes visible the sparkle, clarity, and bubbles of pilsners and other lighter beers. At the same time, it helps retain a beer’s head, which keeps volatile aromatics locked under your nose. Typically, pilsner glasses hold less beer than a pint glass–usually somewhere in the vicinity of 12 to 14 ounces.Appropriate Beer Styles inculde pilsner, American adjunct lagers, bock, helles bock, maibock, Vienna lager, blonde ale, California common, Japanese rice lager, witbier.

    3 Tulip Glass is best for: Belgian ales. Also works for IPAs and stouts. The bowl traps the aroma and the stem allows for a good swirl. This is one of the most versatile types of bar glasses. With its flared mouth, wide, bulbous belly, and stubby little stem, you’ll instantly feel like a Brugge-born Belgian beer snob. Aside from looking cool hanging from your bar and making you look like a better person than your bottle-guzzling friends, the glass shape actually takes a delicious beer style and makes it exquisite.This is one of the types of beer glasses that is a beer-enhancing machine from top to bottom—its rim corrals the head, its bulb traps more aromas inside, and the stem allows for an easy swirl to release more flavor. Sure, you can’t pronounce the beers right, but you’re drinking experience would look cool! Watch this video on how to pour your beer in this glass for added class!

    4 The American Pint Glass is easy to clean, cheap, holds a lot of beer. Pint glasses are popular not for their beer-enhancing abilities, but more so out of convenience. They are just a slight step up from your 19th century tar-smattered leather drinking flask.The reason they’re so popular is that they are easy to stack and clean, dirt cheap, and wide enough to hold a lot of wheat beer serving and slap a label on.Of course, if you’re just drinking a few beers at home, they’re better than the bottle. And, the wide mouth definitely helps release at least some extra flavor. Still, even if pint glasses can handle a number of different types of beer, they aren’t really good for any in particular. This pint glass is one of the most famous beer glass styles in the market.

    5  Snifter Glasses are best for: Heavy IPAs (double/imperial), Belgian ales, stouts, barleywine. Benefits include wide bowl for swirling and agitation, tapered mouth for aroma. If you’re the kinda guy that loves a good heavy stout or IPA (or happens to be entering a Sir Winston Churchill lookalike contest), having a snifter in your hand will enhance your beer experience like few other types of beer glassware. Although traditionally used for cognac and brandy, beer lovers slowly discovered just how much they enhanced aroma. We even tried a blind taste test here and the results speak for themselves—the snifter glasses won every time.The wide belly short stems are great for swirling and agitating your beer for extra flavor and the tapered lip lets your palette capture more subtle aroma from the drink. Oh yeah, and you can sound like a snob while drinking one.

    Of course, there are more types of beer glasses and you could pour your favorite ale into whatever container you have lying around and successfully deliver beer to your mouth. But there is a reason why particular styles of beer are traditionally served in specific types of beer glasses. It isn’t just for looks. Rather, the different shapes and styles of beer glassware on the market were, in many cases, designed to make more pronounced or otherwise enhance the aromatic compounds inherent to different kinds of beer. And as we all know, the smell has a huge impact on how we perceive flavor. Ergo, the right beer glass can take your beer-drinking experience to new heights.

     

     

    Beer glasses make every brew taste better. Serve your suds in iced beer mugs or quaff craft beer in pilsner glasses. 

    I guess many people wonder why normally we use glasses to drink beer? When you drink out of a bottle or can, you leave your nose out of the party. There’s a case to be made that the eye is an important part of this equation, as well. Pouring a beer into a glass shows off its color, clarity, bubbles, and foam, a view that can add to your excitement when you’re about to partake in the refreshing elixir that’s been delighting humankind since approximately 9,000 B.C..Compared to the thousands of years that humans enjoyed a beer out of stone, wood, and even sacks of leather, the proliferation, and popularization of beer glasses are relatively new, given that glass wasn’t mass produced until the late 1800s.

    Here are a few types of beer glasses.

    1 Beer Mugs. The first mass-produced beer glass was the 10-sided pint mug. The mug replaced pewter tankards but maintained a handle, which kept pub patrons’ hands from inadvertently warming up their brews. After WWII, this model was replaced by a shorter and wider mug embellished with a grenade-like pattern. While not designed to enhance the taste of a beer, the mug’s character, sturdiness, and size makes it a great addition to a party, and it’s recently experienced a resurgence across the pub scene. A beer mug serves two main purposes: it helps you grip your wheat beer (when you’ve had a few extra) and ensures your hands don’t warm it up. They’re great for casually hanging at the bar or on the back deck. If you’re just trying to have your friends over to enjoy a few drinks.

    2 Pilsner Glasses. Tall, slim, and slightly wider at the mouth, a pilsner glass makes visible the sparkle, clarity, and bubbles of pilsners and other lighter beers. At the same time, it helps retain a beer’s head, which keeps volatile aromatics locked under your nose. Typically, pilsner glasses hold less beer than a pint glass–usually somewhere in the vicinity of 12 to 14 ounces.Appropriate Beer Styles inculde pilsner, American adjunct lagers, bock, helles bock, maibock, Vienna lager, blonde ale, California common, Japanese rice lager, witbier.

    3 Tulip Glass is best for: Belgian ales. Also works for IPAs and stouts. The bowl traps the aroma and the stem allows for a good swirl. This is one of the most versatile types of bar glasses. With its flared mouth, wide, bulbous belly, and stubby little stem, you’ll instantly feel like a Brugge-born Belgian beer snob. Aside from looking cool hanging from your bar and making you look like a better person than your bottle-guzzling friends, the glass shape actually takes a delicious beer style and makes it exquisite.This is one of the types of beer glasses that is a beer-enhancing machine from top to bottom—its rim corrals the head, its bulb traps more aromas inside, and the stem allows for an easy swirl to release more flavor. Sure, you can’t pronounce the beers right, but you’re drinking experience would look cool! Watch this video on how to pour your beer in this glass for added class!

    4 The American Pint Glass is easy to clean, cheap, holds a lot of beer. Pint glasses are popular not for their beer-enhancing abilities, but more so out of convenience. They are just a slight step up from your 19th century tar-smattered leather drinking flask.The reason they’re so popular is that they are easy to stack and clean, dirt cheap, and wide enough to hold a lot of wheat beer serving and slap a label on.Of course, if you’re just drinking a few beers at home, they’re better than the bottle. And, the wide mouth definitely helps release at least some extra flavor. Still, even if pint glasses can handle a number of different types of beer, they aren’t really good for any in particular. This pint glass is one of the most famous beer glass styles in the market.

    5  Snifter Glasses are best for: Heavy IPAs (double/imperial), Belgian ales, stouts, barleywine. Benefits include wide bowl for swirling and agitation, tapered mouth for aroma. If you’re the kinda guy that loves a good heavy stout or IPA (or happens to be entering a Sir Winston Churchill lookalike contest), having a snifter in your hand will enhance your beer experience like few other types of beer glassware. Although traditionally used for cognac and brandy, beer lovers slowly discovered just how much they enhanced aroma. We even tried a blind taste test here and the results speak for themselves—the snifter glasses won every time.The wide belly short stems are great for swirling and agitating your beer for extra flavor and the tapered lip lets your palette capture more subtle aroma from the drink. Oh yeah, and you can sound like a snob while drinking one.

    Of course, there are more types of beer glasses and you could pour your favorite ale into whatever container you have lying around and successfully deliver beer to your mouth. But there is a reason why particular styles of beer are traditionally served in specific types of beer glasses. It isn’t just for looks. Rather, the different shapes and styles of beer glassware on the market were, in many cases, designed to make more pronounced or otherwise enhance the aromatic compounds inherent to different kinds of beer. And as we all know, the smell has a huge impact on how we perceive flavor. Ergo, the right beer glass can take your beer-drinking experience to new heights.

     

     

    Read more

  • Famous Cantonese Dish: Beef Chow Fun Famous Cantonese Dish: Beef Chow Fun

    Posted on by TYPICAL MIND

    Beef chow fun is a staple Cantonese dish, made from stir-frying beef, hor fun (wide rice noodles) and bean sprouts.

    The Singaporean government once had legislation that banned Beef chow fun, out of the belief that it was too oily, and thus detrimental to human health. The ban has since been reversed.It is considered as a snack or sometimes a staple food and one of the most basic Cantonese he fun dishes. The ingredient–flat rice noodle is named as “河粉” HeFun in China. Sometimes you may find it spelled as Hor Fun, He Fen or Ho Fun. It is a kind of flat and wide rice noodles  in southern china especially in Guangdong province. Either served in stir fry recipes or soup recipes. I fall I love it when I firstly had a small bowl of ho fun soup.

    Total:20 mins

    Prep:10 mins

    Cook:10 mins

    Mari:15 mins

    Yield: 4 servings

    Ingredients

    For the Marinade:

    1 1/2 tablespoons light soy sauce

    1 1/2 teaspoons dark soy sauce

    1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry)

    1/2 teaspoon sugar

    1/2 teaspoon sesame oil

    1 teaspoon cornstarch

    1 pound beef flank steak (sliced 1/4-inch thick across the grain)

    For the Noodles:

    8 ounces fresh baby corn

    2 garlic cloves

    1/2 pound fresh hor fun

    2 tablespoons oil

    1 tablespoon Chinese black bean sauce

    1 tablespoon oyster sauce

    Optional: light soy sauce (to taste)

     

    Steps to Make It:

    Marinate the Beef

    Gather the ingredients.

    In a large bowl, mix together the light soy sauce, dark soy sauce, rice wine, sugar, sesame oil, and cornstarch.

    Add the beef strips and marinate for at least 15 minutes.

    Prepare the Vegetables and Noodles

    Gather the ingredients.

    While the steak is marinating, prepare the baby corn (and any other vegetables you'll be using) by rinsing them in cold water, draining them, and slicing them in half.

    Peel and mince the garlic.

    If using refrigerated rice noodles, rinse them in warm water to loosen.

    Cut the noodles into 1/2- to 3/4-inch strips.

    Once the beef is done marinating, heat a wok or a large skillet, add 1 tablespoon of oil, and stir fry the beef until it browns.

    Stir in the black bean sauce and stir fry for another 30 seconds. Remove to a bowl and set aside.

    Clean the wok and add the remaining 1 tablespoon of oil. When the oil is hot, add the garlic and stir fry until aromatic.

    Add the hor fun and stir fry for 1 minute.

    Add the baby corn and quickly cook for another 30 seconds.

    Return the beef and any accumulated juices along with the oyster sauce into the wok and stir fry with the noodles for 1 or 2 minutes. Taste and If it’s not salty enough, you can add more light soy sauce or salt to adjust the seasonings.

    Separate into individual plates or serve family-style like they do at your favorite Chinese restaurant.

    Beef chow fun is a staple Cantonese dish, made from stir-frying beef, hor fun (wide rice noodles) and bean sprouts.

    The Singaporean government once had legislation that banned Beef chow fun, out of the belief that it was too oily, and thus detrimental to human health. The ban has since been reversed.It is considered as a snack or sometimes a staple food and one of the most basic Cantonese he fun dishes. The ingredient–flat rice noodle is named as “河粉” HeFun in China. Sometimes you may find it spelled as Hor Fun, He Fen or Ho Fun. It is a kind of flat and wide rice noodles  in southern china especially in Guangdong province. Either served in stir fry recipes or soup recipes. I fall I love it when I firstly had a small bowl of ho fun soup.

    Total:20 mins

    Prep:10 mins

    Cook:10 mins

    Mari:15 mins

    Yield: 4 servings

    Ingredients

    For the Marinade:

    1 1/2 tablespoons light soy sauce

    1 1/2 teaspoons dark soy sauce

    1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry)

    1/2 teaspoon sugar

    1/2 teaspoon sesame oil

    1 teaspoon cornstarch

    1 pound beef flank steak (sliced 1/4-inch thick across the grain)

    For the Noodles:

    8 ounces fresh baby corn

    2 garlic cloves

    1/2 pound fresh hor fun

    2 tablespoons oil

    1 tablespoon Chinese black bean sauce

    1 tablespoon oyster sauce

    Optional: light soy sauce (to taste)

     

    Steps to Make It:

    Marinate the Beef

    Gather the ingredients.

    In a large bowl, mix together the light soy sauce, dark soy sauce, rice wine, sugar, sesame oil, and cornstarch.

    Add the beef strips and marinate for at least 15 minutes.

    Prepare the Vegetables and Noodles

    Gather the ingredients.

    While the steak is marinating, prepare the baby corn (and any other vegetables you'll be using) by rinsing them in cold water, draining them, and slicing them in half.

    Peel and mince the garlic.

    If using refrigerated rice noodles, rinse them in warm water to loosen.

    Cut the noodles into 1/2- to 3/4-inch strips.

    Once the beef is done marinating, heat a wok or a large skillet, add 1 tablespoon of oil, and stir fry the beef until it browns.

    Stir in the black bean sauce and stir fry for another 30 seconds. Remove to a bowl and set aside.

    Clean the wok and add the remaining 1 tablespoon of oil. When the oil is hot, add the garlic and stir fry until aromatic.

    Add the hor fun and stir fry for 1 minute.

    Add the baby corn and quickly cook for another 30 seconds.

    Return the beef and any accumulated juices along with the oyster sauce into the wok and stir fry with the noodles for 1 or 2 minutes. Taste and If it’s not salty enough, you can add more light soy sauce or salt to adjust the seasonings.

    Separate into individual plates or serve family-style like they do at your favorite Chinese restaurant.

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  • 3 Easy Appetizer Recipe 3 Easy Appetizer Recipe

    Posted on by TYPICAL MIND

    The appetizer is a small dish served before a meal. Some are served cold, others hot. Appetizers may be served at the dinner table as a part of the meal, or they may be served before seating.

    In restaurants or large estates,  Appetizers are prepared in a garde manger which is a cool room.  Appetizers are often prepared in advance. Some types may be refrigerated or frozen and then precooked and then reheated in an oven or microwave oven as necessary before serving.

    If there is an extended period between when guests arrive and when the meal is eaten, for example during a cocktail hour, these might serve the purpose of sustaining guests during the wait, in the same way that apéritifs are served as a drink before meals. It is also an unwritten rule that the dishes served as hors d'oeuvres do not give any clue to the main meal.

    1 Sriracha Chicken

    Serves: 4-6  Prep: 10 minutes   Cook:  25-30 minutes

    Ingredients:

    2 1/2 pounds chicken legs (drum sticks), skinless

    1 1/2 cups Sriracha

    1/2 cup honey

    1/2 cup fresh lemon juice

    1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt

    2 tablespoons vegetable oil

    Optional toppings:

    Sesame seeds, chopped green onions, cilantro, lime wedges

    Procedure:

    1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. In a large bowl, evenly coat drumsticks with oil and sprinkle with kosher salt. Arrange on baking sheet and place in oven for 10 minutes.
    2. While chicken is in the oven, make the glaze by combining the Sriracha, honey, and lime juice in a sauce pan. Allow to thicken.
    3. Remove chicken from oven and brush with the sauce. Flip the chicken over and brush the other side as well. Place back in the oven for 5 minutes and repeat process 3-4 times.
    4. Remove from heat. Sprinkle with sesame seeds and green onions. Serve chicken with your favorite grain and vegetable.

    2 Mediterranean Zucchini Boats

    Prep time:  15 mins

    Cook time:  20 mins

    Total time:  35 mins

    Serves: 2-4

     

    Mediterranean Zucchini Boats Prep time: 15 mins Cook time: 20 mins Total time: 35 mins Serves: 2-4

    Ingredients

    • 1½ cups cooked quinoa
    • 3 medium sized green zucchini
    • ½ cup cherry tomatoes, chopped
    • ¼ cup kalamata olives, sliced
    • 1 tablespoon fresh mint, chopped
    • 1 tablespoon curly parsley, chopped
    • 3 tablespoons feta, crumbled
    • 2 tablespoons toasted slivered almonds
    • 2 tablespoons dried apricots, sliced
    • 1½ tablespoons lemon juice
    • 1½ tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
    • 2 tablespoons shallots finely chopped
    • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
    • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

    Instructions

    1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees.
    2. Cut ends and tops off zucchini. Scoop out the seeds.
    3. Line baking sheet with parchment paper.
    4. Arrange zucchini on baking sheet. Brush with olive oil. Sprinkle with kosher salt. Bake for 12-15 minutes.
    5. Make vinaigrette by whisking together olive oil, lemon juice, shallots, kosher salt and fresh ground pepper.
    6. Assemble the filling by mixing quinoa, olives, apricots, tomatoes, almonds, mint, parsley and feta cheese. Toss in vinaigrette.
    7. Allow zucchini to cool and then scoop in quinoa salad mix. Top with more feta if desired.

    3 Cocktail Meatballs

    Ingredients

    1 h 45 m 10 servings    193 cals

    • 1 pound lean ground beef
    • 1 egg
    • 2 tablespoons water
    • 1/2 cup bread crumbs
    • 3 tablespoons minced onion
    • 1 (8 ounces) can jellied cranberry sauce
    • 3/4 cup chili sauce
    • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
    • 1 1/2 teaspoons lemon juice

    Directions:

    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
    2. In a large bowl, mix together the ground beef, egg, water, bread crumbs, and minced onion. Roll into small meatballs.
    3. Bake in preheated oven for 20 to 25 minutes, turning once.
    4. In a slow cooker or large saucepan over low heat, blend the cranberry sauce, chili sauce, brown sugar, and lemon juice. Add meatballs, and simmer for 1 hour before serving.

    The appetizer is a small dish served before a meal. Some are served cold, others hot. Appetizers may be served at the dinner table as a part of the meal, or they may be served before seating.

    In restaurants or large estates,  Appetizers are prepared in a garde manger which is a cool room.  Appetizers are often prepared in advance. Some types may be refrigerated or frozen and then precooked and then reheated in an oven or microwave oven as necessary before serving.

    If there is an extended period between when guests arrive and when the meal is eaten, for example during a cocktail hour, these might serve the purpose of sustaining guests during the wait, in the same way that apéritifs are served as a drink before meals. It is also an unwritten rule that the dishes served as hors d'oeuvres do not give any clue to the main meal.

    1 Sriracha Chicken

    Serves: 4-6  Prep: 10 minutes   Cook:  25-30 minutes

    Ingredients:

    2 1/2 pounds chicken legs (drum sticks), skinless

    1 1/2 cups Sriracha

    1/2 cup honey

    1/2 cup fresh lemon juice

    1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt

    2 tablespoons vegetable oil

    Optional toppings:

    Sesame seeds, chopped green onions, cilantro, lime wedges

    Procedure:

    1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. In a large bowl, evenly coat drumsticks with oil and sprinkle with kosher salt. Arrange on baking sheet and place in oven for 10 minutes.
    2. While chicken is in the oven, make the glaze by combining the Sriracha, honey, and lime juice in a sauce pan. Allow to thicken.
    3. Remove chicken from oven and brush with the sauce. Flip the chicken over and brush the other side as well. Place back in the oven for 5 minutes and repeat process 3-4 times.
    4. Remove from heat. Sprinkle with sesame seeds and green onions. Serve chicken with your favorite grain and vegetable.

    2 Mediterranean Zucchini Boats

    Prep time:  15 mins

    Cook time:  20 mins

    Total time:  35 mins

    Serves: 2-4

     

    Mediterranean Zucchini Boats Prep time: 15 mins Cook time: 20 mins Total time: 35 mins Serves: 2-4

    Ingredients

    • 1½ cups cooked quinoa
    • 3 medium sized green zucchini
    • ½ cup cherry tomatoes, chopped
    • ¼ cup kalamata olives, sliced
    • 1 tablespoon fresh mint, chopped
    • 1 tablespoon curly parsley, chopped
    • 3 tablespoons feta, crumbled
    • 2 tablespoons toasted slivered almonds
    • 2 tablespoons dried apricots, sliced
    • 1½ tablespoons lemon juice
    • 1½ tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
    • 2 tablespoons shallots finely chopped
    • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
    • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

    Instructions

    1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees.
    2. Cut ends and tops off zucchini. Scoop out the seeds.
    3. Line baking sheet with parchment paper.
    4. Arrange zucchini on baking sheet. Brush with olive oil. Sprinkle with kosher salt. Bake for 12-15 minutes.
    5. Make vinaigrette by whisking together olive oil, lemon juice, shallots, kosher salt and fresh ground pepper.
    6. Assemble the filling by mixing quinoa, olives, apricots, tomatoes, almonds, mint, parsley and feta cheese. Toss in vinaigrette.
    7. Allow zucchini to cool and then scoop in quinoa salad mix. Top with more feta if desired.

    3 Cocktail Meatballs

    Ingredients

    1 h 45 m 10 servings    193 cals

    • 1 pound lean ground beef
    • 1 egg
    • 2 tablespoons water
    • 1/2 cup bread crumbs
    • 3 tablespoons minced onion
    • 1 (8 ounces) can jellied cranberry sauce
    • 3/4 cup chili sauce
    • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
    • 1 1/2 teaspoons lemon juice

    Directions:

    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
    2. In a large bowl, mix together the ground beef, egg, water, bread crumbs, and minced onion. Roll into small meatballs.
    3. Bake in preheated oven for 20 to 25 minutes, turning once.
    4. In a slow cooker or large saucepan over low heat, blend the cranberry sauce, chili sauce, brown sugar, and lemon juice. Add meatballs, and simmer for 1 hour before serving.

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